To download full PDF of the Map of Bayou Meto visit the AGFC website. Double click the map to view the zoom lens.

Bayou Meto is one of the largest state-owned wildlife management areas in the nation, encompassing 33,832 acres in Arkansas and Jefferson counties. The topography is generally flat with little more than an 11-foot change in elevation over the entire area. The area has a north-south elongation, with the southernmost extension of the area separated from the main body by a distance of one mile.

Sixteen all-weather (graveled) roads are available, totaling 17.4 miles. In addition, 25 secondary (non-graveled) roads are scattered throughout the area, but are only for AGFC employees conducting management and enforcement work.
There are eight permanent streams, totaling 30.5 miles, including Five Forks, Wabbaseka Bayou, Government Cypress Slough, Bear Bayou, Dry Bayou, West Bayou, Cross Bayou, Little Bayou Meto and Big Bayou Meto. Twelve intermediate streams, totaling 23 miles in length, form an extensive drainage network which feeds the major permanent waterways. Seventeen ditches totaling 26 miles contribute to the flooding and drainage. The largest and most significant is the Salt Bayou Ditch which extends 8 miles into the WMA.

Six lakes, totaling 1,080 acres, are on the area. Halowell Reservoir is the largest, being 600 acres, followed by Grand Cypress lake (280 acres), Cox Cypress (150 acres) and Wrape Lake (80 acres).

About 13,000 acres of Bayou Meto are flooded each fall to attract ducks. Two waterfowl rest areas, Halowell Reservoir and the Wrape Plantation, also attract ducks in fall and winter.